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Data, should be presented for the human eye, otherwise "it doesn't exist", it can be displayed visually on papers or electronic devices, the latter is a way to output the electronically transmitted data (text, image, video) in visual or tactile form, without producing a permanent record.

Legend
  • Date
  • Developer
  • Abbreviation of
  • Based on
  • Peak Luminosity
  • Color depth
  • Response time
  • Refresh rate
  • Influences
  • Max Size
  • Power Consumption
  • MicroLED (Micro Light-Emitting Diode) display logo
    MicroLED
    • 2000
    • Texas Tech University

      Texas Tech University (Texas Tech, Tech, or TTU) is a public research university in Lubbock, Texas, United States. Established on February 10, 1923, and called until 1969 Texas Technological College. More info

    • Texas Tech University
    • MicroLED

      Also known as micro-LED, mLED or µLED, is an emerging flat-panel display technology. microLED displays consist of arrays of microscopic LEDs forming the individual pixel elements. When compared with widespread LCD technology, microLED displays offer better contrast, response times, and energy efficiency. Along with OLEDs, microLEDs are primarily aimed at small, low-energy devices such as smartwatches and smartphones. OLED and microLED both offer greatly reduced energy requirements when compared to conventional LCD systems while also offering an infinite contrast ratio.

    • Micro Light-Emitting Diode
    • ILED

      Inorganic Light-Emitting Diode, which is based on Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) semiconductors.

    • ILED
    • Low
  • Mini-LED (Mini Light-Emitting Diode) display logo
    Mini-LED
    • Mini Light-Emitting Diode

      Mini LED displays are LED-backlit LCD with Mini LED-based backlighting supporting over a thousand of Full array local dimming (FALD) zones. This allows deeper blacks and higher contrast ratio. Not to be confused with MicroLED.

    • Mini Light-Emitting Diode
    • LCD
    • 1460 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • 1-8 ms
    • Up to 360 Hz
    • Temperatures
    • Up to 108"
    • Low
  • AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode) display logo
    AMOLED
    • Before 2007
    • Samsung

      Is a South Korean multinational conglomerate headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul. It comprises numerous affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand, and is the largest South Korean chaebol (business conglomerate).
      More info: here and here.

    • Samsung
    • Active-Matrix OLED

      AMOLED (active-matrix organic light-emitting diode) is a type of OLED display device technology. OLED describes a specific type of thin-film-display technology in which organic compounds form the electroluminescent material, and active matrix refers to the technology behind the addressing of pixels. Since 2007, AMOLED technology has been used in mobile phones, media players, TVs and digital cameras, and it has continued to make progress toward low-power, low-cost, high resolution and large size (for example, 88-inch and 8K resolution) applications.

    • Active-Matrix OLED
    • OLED
    • 700 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • Under 0.01
    • Up to 120 Hz
    • Static Images

      Static images causes burn in.

    • Static Images
    • Up to 88"
    • Medium
  • OLED (Organic Light-Emitting Diode) display logo
    OLED
    • 1987
    • Eastman Kodak

      The Eastman Kodak Company (referred to simply as Kodak) is an American public company that produces various products related to its historic basis in analogue photography. The company is headquartered in Rochester, New York, and is incorporated in New Jersey. Kodak provides packaging, functional printing, graphic communications, and professional services for businesses around the world. Its main business segments are Print Systems, Enterprise Inkjet Systems, Micro 3D Printing and Packaging, Software and Solutions, and Consumer and Film. It is best known for photographic film products.
      More info: here

    • Eastman Kodak
    • Organic Light-Emitting Diode

      An organic light-emitting diode (OLED or organic LED), also known as organic electroluminescent (organic EL) diode, is a light-emitting diode (LED) in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound that emits light in response to an electric current. This organic layer is situated between two electrodes; typically, at least one of these electrodes is transparent. OLEDs are used to create digital displays in devices such as television screens, computer monitors, portable systems such as smartphones, handheld game consoles and PDAs. A major area of research is the development of white OLED devices for use in solid-state lighting applications. There are two main families of OLED: those based on small molecules and those employing polymers. Adding mobile ions to an OLED creates a light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) which has a slightly different mode of operation. An OLED display can be driven with a passive-matrix (PMOLED) or active-matrix (AMOLED) control scheme. In the PMOLED scheme, each row (and line) in the display is controlled sequentially, one by one, whereas AMOLED control uses a thin-film transistor backplane to directly access and switch each individual pixel on or off, allowing for higher resolution and larger display sizes. An OLED display works without a backlight because it emits visible light. Thus, it can display deep black levels and can be thinner and lighter than a liquid crystal display (LCD). In low ambient light conditions (such as a dark room), an OLED screen can achieve a higher contrast ratio than an LCD, regardless of whether the LCD uses cold cathode fluorescent lamps or an LED backlight. OLED displays are made in the same way as LCDs, but after TFT (for active matrix displays), addressable grid (for passive matrix displays) or ITO segment (for segment displays) formation, the display is coated with hole injection, transport and blocking layers, as well with electroluminescent material after the 2 first layers, after which ITO or metal may be applied again as a cathode and later the entire stack of materials is encapsulated. The TFT layer, addressable grid or ITO segments serve as or are connected to the anode, which may be made of ITO or metal. OLEDs can be made flexible and transparent, with transparent displays being used in smartphones with optical fingerprint scanners and flexible displays being used in foldable smartphones.

    • Organic Light-Emitting Diode
    • -
    • 700 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • Under 0.01
    • Up to 120 Hz
    • Static Images

      Static images causes burn in.

    • Static Images
    • Up to 88"
    • Medium
  • QLED Quantum Light-Emitting Diode display logo
    QLED
    • 1990s
    • Samsung

      Is a South Korean multinational conglomerate headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul. It comprises numerous affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand, and is the largest South Korean chaebol (business conglomerate).
      More info: here and here.

    • Samsung
    • Quantum Dot light-Emitting diode

      A quantum dot display is a display device that uses quantum dots (QD), semiconductor nanocrystals which can produce pure monochromatic red, green, and blue light. Photo-emissive quantum dot particles are used in a QD layer which uses the blue light from a backlight to emit pure basic colors which improve display brightness and color gamut by reducing light losses and color crosstalk in RGB LCD color filters, replacing traditional colored photoresists in RGB LCD color filters. This technology is used in LED-backlit LCDs, though it is applicable to other display technologies which use color filters, such as blue/UV OLED or MicroLED. LED-backlit LCDs are the main application of quantum dots, where they are used to offer an alternative to OLED displays.

    • Quantum Dot light-Emitting diode
    • LCD
    • 1460 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • 1-8 ms
    • Up to 360 Hz
    • Temperatures
    • Up to 108"
    • Low
  • TFT Thin Film Transistor display logo
    TFT
    • 1973
    • WRL

      Westinghouse Research Laboratories.

    • WRL
    • Thin-Film-Transistor

      A thin-film transistor (TFT) is a special type of metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) made by depositing thin films of an active semiconductor layer as well as the dielectric layer and metallic contacts over a supporting (but non-conducting) substrate. A common substrate is glass, because the primary application of TFTs is in liquid-crystal displays (LCDs). This differs from the conventional bulk MOSFET transistor, where the semiconductor material typically is the substrate, such as a silicon wafer.

    • Thin-Film-Transistor
    • LCD
    • 1460 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • 1-8 ms
    • Up to 360 Hz
    • Temperatures
    • Up to 108"
    • Low
  • LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) logo
    LCD
    • 1964
    • George H. Heilmeier

      George Harry Heilmeier (May 22, 1936 – April 21, 2014) was an American engineer, manager, and a pioneering contributor to liquid crystal displays (LCDs), for which he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Heilmeier's work is an IEEE Milestone.
      More info about him: here

    • George H. Heilmeier
    • Liquid-Crystal Display

      A liquid-crystal display (LCD) is a flat-panel display or other electronically modulated optical device that uses the light-modulating properties of liquid crystals combined with polarizers. Liquid crystals do not emit light directly, instead using a backlight or reflector to produce images in color or monochrome. LCDs are available to display arbitrary images (as in a general-purpose computer display) or fixed images with low information content, which can be displayed or hidden, such as preset words, digits, and seven-segment displays, as in a digital clock. They use the same basic technology, except that arbitrary images are made from a matrix of small pixels, while other displays have larger elements. LCDs can either be normally on (positive) or off (negative), depending on the polarizer arrangement. For example, a character positive LCD with a backlight will have black lettering on a background that is the color of the backlight, and a character negative LCD will have a black background with the letters being of the same color as the backlight. Optical filters are added to white on blue LCDs to give them their characteristic appearance.

    • Liquid-Crystal Display
    • -
    • 1460 nits
    • 10-bit per subpixel
    • 1-8 ms
    • Up to 360 Hz
    • Temperatures
    • Up to 108"
    • Low
  • Plasma PDP display logo
    Plasma
    • 1964
    • University of Illinois

      The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (U of I, Illinois, or colloquially the University of Illinois or UIUC)[7][8] is a public land-grant research university in Illinois in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana. It is the flagship institution of the University of Illinois system and was founded in 1867.
      More about the university: here

    • University of Illinois
    • Plasma

      A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display that uses small cells containing plasma: ionized gas that responds to electric fields. Plasma TVs were the first flat panel displays to be released to the public. Until about 2007, plasma displays were commonly used in large televisions (30 inches (76 cm) and larger). Since then, they have lost nearly all market share due to competition from low-cost LCDs and more expensive but high-contrast OLED flat-panel displays. Manufacturing of plasma displays for the United States retail market ended in 2014, and manufacturing for the Chinese market ended in 2016. Plasma displays are obsolete, having been superseded in most if not all aspects by OLED displays.

    • -
    • -
    • 200 nits
    • 8-bit per subpixel
    • Under 0.001 ms
    • Up to 600 Hz
    • Altitude Pressure

      Which makes this display technology not suitable for high altitude activities like climbing high mountains, flying ...

    • Altitude Pressure
    • Up to 150"
    • Medium
  • CRT (Cathode-Ray Tube) display logo
    CRT
    • 1922
    • John Bertrand Johnson

      John Bertrand "Bert" Johnson (October 2, 1887 – November 27, 1970) (né Johan Erik Bertrand) was a Swedish-born American electrical engineer and physicist.[2] He first explained in detail a fundamental source of random interference with information traveling on wires.
      More about John: here

    • John Bertrand Johnson
    • Cathode-Ray Tube

      The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that contains one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen, and is used to display images. It modulates, accelerates, and deflects electron beam(s) onto the screen to create the images. The images may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets, or other phenomena. CRTs have also been used as memory devices, in which case the visible light emitted from the fluorescent material (if any) is not intended to have significant meaning to a visual observer (though the visible pattern on the tube face may cryptically represent the stored data).

    • Cathode-Ray Tube
    • -
    • 176 nits
    • 24-bit per pixel
    • Under 0.01 ms
    • Up to 200 Hz
    • Ambient Magnetic Fields
    • Ambient Magnetic Fields
    • Up to 43"
    • High
Note(s):
- There are many other display technologies like SED and FED ..., but we considered only the most and commonly used ones that has enough information to include in the comparison.

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REFERENCES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_display
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid-crystal_display
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thin-film-transistor_liquid-crystal_display
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_dot
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OLED
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMOLED
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroLED
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LED-backlit_LCD
https://medium.com/hd-pro/understanding-oled-qled-mini-led-microled-dont-be-misled-30520b686fcb
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_CRT,_LCD,_Plasma,_and_OLED_displays
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_depth
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Response_time_(technology)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refresh_rate

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Inacuracy Bug Copyright
i Click/Tap for more information about the feature.
- : N/A (Non-Applicable).
Feature Existence:
Implemented.
Not implemented.
Work in progress.
No info available yet.
Text colors:
Accent text: Good.
Yellow text: Acceptable.
Red text: Bad.
More details
Peak Luminosity

Top radiated electromagnetic power (light) that the panel can reach.

Color depth

The number of bits used to indicate the color of a single pixel, in a bitmapped image or video framebuffer, or the number of bits used for each color component of a single pixel.

Response time

It is the total amount of time it takes to respond to a request for the display panel.

Refresh rate

The number of times per second that a raster-based video display device displays a new image.

Influences

The most popular factors that can affect the display panel's functionality and performance either on short term use or long term use.